There is more to providing learning for the I.T. industry than just teaching code!

As IT trainers, should we be installing and promoting “good practice” and “ethics” alongside the coding and theory?

With the absence of a professional regulatory body in I.T. and web development, it is up to us to self-regulate. In doing so, it is essential that we pass on ethics and good practice to the next generation of developers and coders. It is not enough to just teach “good code” and computational thinking, we must provide the wisdom and morals to allow our students to implement their code in an ethical way.

Hacking, espionage, directed advertisements, ransomware, cyber-terrorism, fake news, fraud, spam, SQL injections, sexting, legacy content, the right to be forgotten -etc. are the headline threats to the future of our “on-line” world. However, beyond the obvious are the underlying ethics that affect our daily interactions in the digital age. It is crucial, I believe, that we create a culture of “best practice” within the IT industry to maintain our integrity and elicit trust from our clients and the wider public.

So, if I am not talking about the headline threats to online and digital ethics, what am I talking about?

I am referring to the need for standards and collaboration across the industry. The simple things that make life easier for us all:

  • Indenting your code so others can read your code
  • Commenting on your code so others can understand it
  • Personalising your code so others can’t plagiarise it
  • Make your code efficient and elegant to inspire others
  • Share code snippets with others so we can learn from your code and you from ours
  • Develop your code to be neutral of external influences (no politics, race, borders)

 

Let us now break these points down.

Indenting code

Indenting code has its advantages and disadvantages, but I will argue the positives far outweigh the negatives. Just as we use white space and paragraph in the written language to add emphasis and separate concepts, written code also benefits from this. Placing blocks of code separate from other blocks, or indented within a larger or parent block, helps others to read your code. Not only that, it makes it much easier for the developer themselves to isolate blocks of code when it comes to debugging or showcasing the code to the client or other team members. Different coding languages will have different levels of indentation built in – Python for example – whereas HTML will not enforce indentation (unless you are using a dedicated code editor or IDE). The W3C does go some way to highlight the need for indentation in their style guide by suggesting

·        Do not add blank lines without a reason.

·        For readability, add blank lines to separate large or logical code blocks.

·        For readability, add two spaces of indentation.

·        Do not use the tab key.

·        Do not use unnecessary blank lines and indentation. It is not necessary to indent every element.

Sublime Text 3 has a really innovative way of helping with indentation, it places gridlines that connect the levels of indent so you can visualise related blocks of code. This also helps with ensuring you properly </close> your elements. As mentioned before though, these are just “best practice” at the most, and are neither enforced nor necessary. This naturally causes ambiguity in code with various editors creating different indent depths, some automatically create indents (Dreamweaver etc) whilst others do not (Notepad++, Sublime Text, Brackets). The point I make here is, someone new to the coding environment using a free editor will not necessarily be aware of indenting. Does this make their code wrong? Does it stop it from working? Will it stop them from being paid? The answer is no! However, it may not endear them to their colleagues and will place them apart as “noobs” and will hopefully imply they are not certified developers – a theme we shall return to later.

<!– Commenting your code –>

I understand that commenting your code is more associated with teachers wanting their students to show their understanding when compiling code, but its use is far more important than that. If you are being paid to write code for a company, they will often own the intellectual property rights to the code. Therefore, they have a right to understand what parts of the code are doing. That aside, if you are working as part of a team, other members of your team will need to know what parts of the code are doing. I am certainly not suggesting you comment every line or element, but you should comment a block, function, iteration, concept, external file etc – for your own understanding and sanity if not that of others. I am not referring to putting in an <alt> text for an image – although clearly, that is good practice too – I am more concerned about professional ethics and good practice rather than semantics.

Personalising your code so others can’t plagiarise it so easily.

Ok, this may seem sneaky, but using another developers code as your own is far sneakier! It may also be prudent to add comments to code to try and catch those plagiarising your code, or using it for financial gain and infringing your intellectual property rights. Beyond commenting, you could also add a few “false” lines of code. I am all for sharing code or examining others code as a starting point or inspiration, but within that, you should <!–comment–> in a #reference to the original code and thus, credit the author.

 

Share code snippets with others so we can learn from your code and you from ours.Finally – join a forum! Learn, share, create, collaborate, ask, tell, say, question, expand. There are plenty of places to get involved. Stack Overflow is simply amazing and a must join for any budding or professional developer. Join “roughly 40 million developers who visit the site every month” and ask more than 8,000 questions a day! Another great resource is GitHub where you can share and collaborate.

I hope this article has gone some way in helping you understand the importance of Industry ethics and “good practice”. If it has…or hasn’t… please LIKESHARE or FEEDBACK the post. Thank you.

About the Author, – Dr Richard Haddlesey is the founder and Webmaster of English Medieval Architecture in which he gained a Ph.D. in 2010 and holds Qualified Teacher Status relating to I.C.T. and Computer Science. Richard is a professional Web Developer and Digital Archaeologist and holds several degrees relating to this. He is passionate about the dissemination of research and advancement of digital education and Continued Professional Development #CPD. Driven by a desire to better prepare students for industry, Richard left mainstream teaching to focus on a career in tutoring I.T. professionals with real industry ready skills that matter at The Training Room.

#ttrIT #ttrcareerinIT #ttrLearnToCode

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Cloud Chaos?

As a student, I was always told – no forced – to create folders on my computer to store all documents pertaining to one course or project. All files, no matter the extension or type, go in a folder so they can all be found and all the links to files will work. The same was true for your desktop, keep it clean, keep it in folders. I am a huge fan of arranging all my work into folders and logical places on my physical drives. That often means I do have to use USB sticks to transfer work over to another device, but at least you can. So, for years now, I have been meticulously placing the right file in the right folder to enable myself to locate the said file with ease and to ensure if I copy a folder over -via memory stick – to another device, that all the “stuff” is there. Makes sense I hope?

Now, we have cloud storage, cloud backups, cloud software, cloud this and cloud that. Most major companies offer cloud storage or backup;

·        Microsoft OneDrive

·        Google Drive

·        Adobe Creative Cloud

·        GitHub

·        Kindle Cloud Reader

·        Dropbox

·        Sony Memories

·        Canon/Nikon for photos

·        Samsung

·        iCloud

The list goes on. Most of the list above create a folder on your physical drive that is “synced” to the “cloud”. So, the work you do on MS Word will be in a OneDrive folder, while the image you created will be in your Adobe Creative Cloud folder. More on this later, but I think we need to look at what the cloud is first?

The “cloud” is a physical location! It is not a cloud of data that just floats in space waiting for you to grab at it. The cloud will not rain data when it gets near a hilltop or the North of England. It is located on various servers at various server farms around the globe (depending on the size of the company that stores your cloud data). Those servers are constantly connected to the World Wide Web and the internet so that you can access your data anywhere at any time. The data is across several different farms, often floating back and forth (a cloud of data) to ensure the data is always backed up and accessible should a server fail. So then, the cloud is rather fantastic! You can work on any device, at any location, on any platform, using various software at any time – within reason and with some caveats. On top of this, you can rest assured you have a copy of a file backed up somewhere. Even if you delete a file, there is a greater chance of recovering it or at least finding an older version of it.

So, all this is great! So why the title “Cloud Chaos”? Well, if we think back to the folder scenario I have already eluded to, we now need to create a folder for each cloud provider rather than for each project. My simple logic brain now struggles to think – which cloud provider has what file in which subfolder for which project? For instance, I could be planning and designing a web page. I may write all the text in MS Word first, then save the work in my OneDrive so I can access the document on my phone too. Next, I create an image in Photoshop and save the image in my Adobe Creative Cloud folder. I may start my HTML code in Dreamweaver and save it too to the Adobe Creative Cloud, but my colleague needs to work on the code too, so I place the code on GitHub so we can share the code in real time without having to give them access to my Adobe account. So now I have different files in different cloud folders. This is amazing, that colleagues can share work and be assured they are working on the latest iteration, however, my poor dyslexic mind cannot cope easily with files in various locations rather than in just one location that I control. So, on one hand, our workflow has the potential to grow and the potential of collaboration is almost limitless (bandwidth and latency aside). This is, understandably why the cloud is so popular. Especially, as most cloud services come as an add-on to your software package. Or, in the case of Dropbox, are essentially free – unless you need larger storage through a business account. It really is quite amazing!

So, why the chaos? Well, simply because your files are now spread across various cloud providers and it is not until you bring it all together can it be stored in one location. So, if we take Dreamweaver as our example, we need to place all the associated files in a root folder so the website can link to all its assets relatively. All the image files will be in the default image folder, HTML in another, CSS and JavaScript in others. So, we need to take the original files out of the cloud folder and place them on our server so the links all work etc. For most people, this probably is not an issue, but for me – with dyslexia and short-term memory loss – it is a nightmare! Did I move the file? Where is the file? Am I working with the latest version? Have I put all the files in the right folder and deposited it all on the server? I agree, the cloud makes life more collaborative and intuitive for most, but it is a new way of working that does take time to adapt to. Clearly, I am slowly getting used to disparate folders and locations.

How do you manage all your files and folders? Do you have your files across several paths and folders? How do you collate and share your workflow?

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I hope this article has gone some way in helping you understand the importance of UPDATES. If it has…please LIKESHARE or FEEDBACK the post. Thank you.

About the Author, – Dr Richard Haddlesey is the founder and Webmaster of English Medieval Architecture in which he gained a Ph.D. in 2010 and holds Qualified Teacher Status relating to I.C.T. and Computer Science. Richard is a professional Web Developer and Digital Archaeologist and holds several degrees relating to this. He is passionate about the dissemination of research and advancement of digital education and Continued Professional Development #CPD. Driven by a desire to better prepare students for industry, Richard left mainstream teaching to focus on a career in tutoring I.T. professionals with real industry ready skills that matter at The Training Room.

#ttrIT #ttrcareerinIT #ttrLearnToCode

Visit his Blog and Website

Read more about Dr Richard Haddlesey BSc MSc PGCE PhD

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I don’t wanna be Cyber Attacked – what can I do?

A question I often get asked is should I accept all these annoying updates from Microsoft.

YES! Is the short answer, and really the only answer, but many don’t or won’t?

OK, so there are caveats. If you only connect to your own network at home, never use the World Wide Web, never do anything that requires passwords and do not use internet banking, then no, you do not need to update. If you do, however, you really should!

In a recent whitepaper, DUO* suggested that over 65% of devices running Microsoft Windows are running the outdated Windows 7 released back in 2009. The operating system was withdrawn from support in January 2015 as it was too vulnerable to attack, although, Microsoft will still release minor security fixes until 2020. That, removal of support, was over two years ago, so if you are still running Windows 7 and accessing the World Wide Web, you are extremely vulnerable to attack! Microsoft even offered a free upgrade to the more robust Windows 10 for free, yet people still did not switch. I appreciate that people still like Windows XP and Windows 7, but they are just no longer safe or relevant in today’s online world. The software is changed and updated for a reason, it is not just to make money – after all, they gave it away for free – it is to plug the data holes and keep you safe online. This is not just a problem with out of date Windows devices, it is also the same for Android and iOS on Macs. Yes, the Mac is just as vulnerable to attacks**, it is just with about 7% of the P.C. market, you tend to hear less about it***.

  • If you continue to use Windows XP now that support has ended, your computer will still work but it might become more vulnerable to security risks and viruses. Internet Explorer 8 is also no longer supported, so if your Windows XP PC is connected to the Internet and you use Internet Explorer 8 to surf the web, you might be exposing your PC to additional threats. Also, as more software and hardware manufacturers continue to optimize for more recent versions of Windows, you can expect to encounter more apps and devices that do not work with Windows XP. —Microsoft

Now, if you take your “old” device into work to connect to their network, you are now making your entire company vulnerable to attack! Once you open a port from your device to the work intranet or Wi-Fi, you are giving attackers – via your outdated software – instant access to the network. Not only that, you are allowing a would-be attacker easy access to an otherwise secure business network. At the very least, everything you can access an attacker can also access. If they are sophisticated, they can potentially gain access to all the network. All this, just because you really like older versions of Windows! At my former place of work (a secondary school) a teacher brought in their old XP laptop and opened an email, they received from a person they did not know. Unwittingly, by opening that email on the school network, they introduced ransomware onto the network. This encrypted the entire school network and all drives. For nearly a week, the school network was unusable while the technicians worked to restore previous network backups. When the system was eventually restored, all the recent files people had been working on since the backup were lost. Obviously, the school did not pay any ransom, but only because they back up the system files twice a week; had they not have done – there would have been no way to restore the files without paying the ransom and getting the unlock code.

In the light of recent cyber attacks, in May 2017 –  Microsoft has come out and said this is a “wake-up call” and reiterates the need to install their security patches as, and when, they are released.

  • Ransomware is a type of malware that prevents or limits users from accessing their system, either by locking the system’s screen or by locking the users’ files unless a ransom is paid. More modern ransomware families, collectively categorized as crypto-ransomware, encrypt certain file types on infected systems and forces users to pay the ransom through certain online payment methods to get a decrypt key.https://www.trendmicro.co.uk/vinfo/uk/security/definition/ransomware

I am certainly not trying to imply that, had the user been using an updated version of Windows 10 that that would never have happened. Instead, I am trying to add to the discussion that the often overlooked threat to network security is internal human errors****. However, “User Behavioural Analytics” are beyond the scope of this discussion.

Summary

Keeping your system up to date with the latest security patches and software add-ons remains a highly important step in combating hackers.

In short —

INSTALL and UPDATE

  • Your Operating System
  • Your browser
  • Your browser add-ons
  • Anti-Virus software
  • Anti-Malware software
  • Anti-Spyware software
  • Firewall

·        Do NOT open unknown emails and attachments EVER!

Some people tend to think that if your device is set to download and install updates alongside a disk defragmentation automatically at the default time of 03:00AM, then that is enough to keep them safe if they turn their machine off before bed. Well,…are you saying you expect the device to wake up at 03:00 and turn itself on, connect – by itself – to the internet, download and install updates/patches/drivers/code then check your hard drive for errors – before turning itself off again and going back to sleep? I’m sorry but it doesn’t!


 

I hope this article has gone some way in helping you understand the importance of UPDATES. If it has…please LIKESHARE or FEEDBACK the post. Thank you.

About the Author, – Dr Richard Haddlesey is the founder and Webmaster of English Medieval Architecture in which he gained a Ph.D. in 2010 and holds Qualified Teacher Status relating to I.C.T. and Computer Science. Richard is a professional Web Developer and Digital Archaeologist and holds several degrees relating to this. He is passionate about the dissemination of research and advancement of digital education and Continued Professional Development #CPD. Driven by a desire to better prepare students for industry, Richard left mainstream teaching to focus on a career in tutoring I.T. professionals with real skills that matter.

#ttrIT #ttrcareerinIT #ttrLearnToCode

Visit his Blog and Website

Read more about Dr Richard Haddlesey BSc MSc PGCE PhD

Bibliography

*https://duo.com/resources/ebooks/the-2016-duo-trusted-access-report-microsoft-edition

**https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2016/09/02/patch-now-recent-ios-vulnerability-affects-macs-too/

***http://www.macworld.co.uk/how-to/mac-software/do-macs-get-viruses-do-macs-need-antivirus-software-3454926/

**** The Essential Guide to Behavior Analytics – www.balabit.com

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IT Courses Online From The Training Room

In 2015 it was reported that the IT industry in the UK experienced its fastest growth since 2008. According to this report, it was also noted that demand for jobs in the IT industry was growing fast, especially among start-ups.

As a result of this growing demand for jobs in the IT industry training courses have become quite popular, whether it be full-time, part-time or e-learning.

Through our years of experience in helping people make a real change in their lives, we recognise that sometimes people don’t have the time to commit to full-time or part-time courses.

If this sounds like your current situation then we might just have the solution to your problem!

Here at The Training Room, we offer a variety of IT e-learning courses which enable you to study at a pace that suits you so that you don’t have to miss out on your commitments such as family life.

Backed by CIW and CompTIA, our range of e-learning IT courses are designed to have you qualified and ‘industry-ready’ for your new career in the IT industry.

In this blog we look at the range of e-learning IT courses offered at The Training Room. From web development to infrastructure technology we’ve got a course to help you turn your passion for IT into a career you love.

Designed With You In Mind

Our approach to flexible learning means that we understand the kind of support people need. This is why we have developed our online learning to include the following benefits for our students:

  • Flexible learning – Through access to our state of the art e-learning platform you can study at a pace that suits you
  • Convenience – As all of your learning takes place online you can study from the comfort of your home
  • Support – As an e-learning student with The Training Room you will be provided with a dedicated tutor who is a specialist in your area to help and support you with your learning
  • No deadline pressure – With our online IT courses you can take control of your start and finish date meaning that there’s no need to feel that dreaded ‘deadline pressure’

Additionally, with our IT e-learning courses, you will also be supported through career support for 3 years along with a guaranteed interview with one of our corporate partners from the moment you register.

Infrastructure Technician Course

Are you a problem solver with a keen interest in computers? If so then a career as a Infrastructure Technician might just be your calling!

At the Training Room, we offer our Infrastructure Technician course which is a globally recognised qualification accredited by CompTIA. Our flexible e-learning course will provide you with all the knowledge you need on becoming an Infrastructure Technician, from working with operating systems to setting up a computer. The modules covered in this course include:

  • IT Fundamentals – This module focuses on understanding computer components, setting up and maintaining computers to network fundamentals.
  • CompTIA A+ – This specific module goes deeper into understanding working with other operating systems, safety and operational considerations and security threats.
  • CompTIA Network+ – Serving as an introduction to networks, this module will give you a better scope of network topologies, wiring standards and connectors, IP addresses and subnetting.

Web Development Course

Coding your way to becoming a Junior Web Developer has never been easier with our W eb Design and Development course. Our course will have you qualified and ‘industry-ready’ for your next step as a Web Developer.

Our qualification in web design and development includes modules in:

  • CSS3 – Understanding the essentials of CSS3 while learning the application of basic and advanced functions of the current version
  • HTML5 – Understanding the technologies implemented for enhancing user web experiences
  • Graphical User Interface (GUI) Design – Learning the use of website development tools
  • Networking – This module will develop your understanding of basic data communication components, configuring common hardware for operations and the role of networking hardware
  • JavaScript – Learning to use Javascript for creation of forms while getting a better understanding of Javascript security issues

Security Technologist Course

For those keen to learn about online security we offer our Security Technologist coursewhich is also accredited by the industry recognised and respected CompTIA.

Our Security Technologist course is designed to provide you with a greater understanding of analysing risks, uncovering breaches and developing solutions for security of information. The course covers the following modules:

  • CompTIA A+ – Understanding operational considerations and security threats to working with other operating systems.
  • CompTIA Network+ – Developing a better scope on network topologies, wiring standards and connectors
  • CompTIA Security+ – Growing your understanding and practice of monitoring and diagnosing networkings to protecting wireless networks from viruses and security risks

Software Developer Course

If you have a basic knowledge of computer skills which is combined with a keep interest in coding then our Software Developer course is just for you!

Here at The Training Room, we offer our Software Developer course which is designed to equip you with all the knowledge you need to become a successful Software Developer . The modules in this course include:

  • Microsoft Software Development Fundamentals (MTA) – Developing knowledge in core programming, general software development and understanding databases
  • CIW: Advanced HTML5 and CSS3 Specialist – Gaining hands-on experience in HTML5 and CSS3
  • Oracle OCA Java SE 8 Programmer Course – Learning the fundamentals of Oracle Java SE 8 Programmer through developing Java applications to master Java data types
  • Microsoft MCSA/MCSE Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2012 – Understanding performance based labs, database objects and working and modifying data

Ready to start your journey as an IT professional?

If you are ready to start your journey as an IT professional then check out our IT online courses here. Likewise, you can also check out our website for further information on The Training Room. Or, why not give one of our friendly advisors a call or fill out an enquiry form on our website to request more information.

Your next career in the IT industry is just one step away, start your journey with The Training Room!

PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS A REPOST FROM THE TRAINING ROOM AND NOT MY OWN WORDS. ALL CONTENT IS COPYRIGHT OF THE TRAINING ROOM. THEY OWN ALL THIS CONTENT. I AM JUST AN EMPLOYEE.

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IT Security Courses Online From The Training Room

Cybercrime has been on the rise in recent years, so much so that in late 2016 Tesco Bank had £2.5million stolen from the current accounts of 9,000 customers.

As cybercrime has become more present in society this has resulted in a growing demand for all industries to
ensure that their information is kept safe from the reach of hackers. As a result of this growing demand for stronger online security, the need for Security Technologist’s has become quite important, in all industries.

Here at The Training Room , we recognise that although many people have a genuine passion for IT security they can often find themselves quite time poor meaning that they don’t have time to commit to full-time or part-time study.

This is why at the Training Room we offer our Security Technologist online course which is e-learning course accredited by the industry recognised and respected CompTIA.

 

Visit the course page

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